Obama/NSA Critics: STFU, Will Ya?

Now some of you here know that I am not shy about criticizin’ our President, right?  And that I have been pretty dubious about many of the statements both he and James Clapper have made about ‘not spyin’ on Americans’.  But holy hell, I now must admit that all along I’d been failin’ to apply Occam’s Razor to the sitchi-ation having gotten too caught up in alleged PRISM slides, adorably named programs like EVIL OLIVE Oyl, Running with SCISSORS, and the ‘coming soon to a Utah Data Center Near You’ MOONLIGHT PATH, etc.

So ignorant am I about even the language of technology, that I got caught up in the drama of learning more than the average sixth-grader, instead of quieting my mind (Oooommmmm) to suss out the simplest explanations of Edward Snowden’s NSA revelations, including the recent revelations that the NSA had been spying on EU backbones, systems, Embassies, and what have you.  As it turns out, our Constitutional Scholar of a President had just helped me see that sometimes logic needs to be succinct, and that the simplest answer is often the correct one.

To wit: who can argue with the simplicity and truth of this logic?  After doing the ho-hum equivalent of ‘Yeah, yeah; that’s how intelligence services operate’, and that ‘once all his peeps review the gripes and allegations made by folks in Europe, he’ll give them all the info they want and set their minds at rest, (‘n save the EU trade deal, he’s thinkin’; you can see his mind whirrin’ $$$s like a fine clock wheel), etc., he says:

“…and…if I wanna know what Chancellor Merkel is thinkin’, I will call Chancellor Merkel (et.al.)…so ultimately, we work so closely together with each other, there’s almost no information that’s not shared uhhhh…between our various countries’.

And there ya have it, baby: Occam’s Razor: he just picks up the phone!  No muss, no fuss, no spyin’, no lyin’; no conspiracies, just kinetic doin’s: he picks up the phone and lets his fingers do the walkin’ and dialin’. Jayzus, the man is seriously clever.

No news back on his soothing-troubled-waters yet that I’ve heard, but my guess is that Hollande and Merkel will see it Occam’s Way, wouldn’t you?  And the way the man’s hands were flippin’ around like worried fish on the podium told us another thing, Obama Critics: he didn’t have his fingers crossed behind his back. 

Additionally, and Lord Luv a Duck; the way folks have been accusing poor James Clapper about lyin’ to Congress about the issue back in March: he has now convinced me that he was.not.lying.  Some stuff I read recently explained his position; here’s the wider, least untruthful history of the thing:

According to the Washington Post (my bold):

Acknowledging the “heated controversy” over his remark, Clapper sent a letter to the Senate Intelligence Committee on June 21 saying that he had misunderstood the question he had been asked.

“I have thought long and hard to re-create what went through my mind at the time,” Clapper said in the previously undisclosed letter. “My response was clearly erroneous — for which I apologize.” [snip]Clapper said he thought Wyden was referring to NSA surveillance of e-mail traffic involving overseas targets, not the separate program in which the agency is authorized to collect records of Americans’ phone calls that include the numbers and duration of calls but not individuals’ names or the contents of their calls.Referring to his appearances before Congress over several decades, Clapper concluded by saying that “mistakes will happen, and when I make one, I correct it.”

Heh, heh: the Guardian even has Ron Wyden sayin’ that Clapper had told him right after the hearing that he’d been wrong when he’d answered the ‘did the NSA collect data on millions of Americans’ question.  ‘Oops’, he’d been big enough to admit.  Some folks say he was just all shook up by the pressures of public speaking, which makes sense since he mostly does a lot of private listening.

In the same piece, while lamenting before an audience last week that ‘so much of the information that was being being spilled was wrong, Robert Litt, general counsel for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence then called on Mark Twain for an aphorism that would prove his point:

“A lie can get halfway around the world before the truth gets its boots on.”

Obama Detractors, take note:  Litt definitely did not tweak Twain by saying ‘before the truth gets its jackboots on’; that would have been a tell the Counselor avoided, huh?  See?

And all that was well before Susan Rice strumpeted trumpeted the fact that Obama had NOT been weakened by the puny Edward Snowden; it ain’t like he’s getting’ out the 101st Airborne or a freakin’ drone to stalk him… so suck it.

I wish I could find the link, but some Obama-hating fuquetards are spreadin’ rumors that this Dylan cover is talkin’ about Our President. That’s.a.big.fat.lie.  He delivered far more than he ever promised: some of you just don’t happen to like it is all.  Sign up for your Obamacare now; time’s a-wastin’.  And call Verizon today: tell ‘em that you’re interested in their ‘Share Everything’ plan.  Tell ’em O and wendydavis sent ya.


(video h/t mafr)

17 responses to “Obama/NSA Critics: STFU, Will Ya?

  1. realitychecker1

    So, darlin’, I see you managed to buck the odds and find your way to some of teh funny, after all. (Laughing thru the tears here.) Don’t ban me, bro!

  2. then it did hit one of the bars for bein’ satire? oh…tears, too. well, stick a pin in the query… ah’m sure you said ‘buck’ just below sweetheart of the rodeo *and* me bein’ a coloraddy gurl (don’t ask about me and gettin’ off horses the wrong way too often, okay?) lol.

    srsly, when i saw that first video, i’d a done a big ole spit-take if i hadn’t been between coffee sips. knew i couldn’t resist playin; with it. he has sold me, of course…

    my banning policy is advertised as the least untruthful policy i could create, so…not to worry, dear rc. i kin beat ya with one hand behand my back (fingers crossed). but do call verizon, okay? i get a finder’s fee…so does O.

  3. Cross posting my own self from FDL, wendye:

    132
    Kiwis trying to damp down the Dotcom saga (nzherald.co.nz opinion piece says his admirable expose’ was ‘turgid’. Hah!) No use, Herald – the Guardian has the videos now. And thedailyblog.co.nz tells us about a wikileak leak showing the nsa set up house in the US Embassy (paid for everything theirselves, not to worry) in 2004. (I think that’s the first wikileak leak I have actually linked to – exciting days!)

    Thank you for more reading list TarheelDem – I think though I already knew that our founders were mere mortals. I’m more interested in their ideas about civil liberties so I’m finding the current text heavy lifting. It’s sure not an easy read. But I shall soldier on. At least delving into the climate of matters in Virginia is fascinating, though I’m not sure how enlightening this very heavy discourse is with respect to why Jefferson has a memorial and Madison doesn’t.

    I hope Evo Morales is home safe by now – nobody seems to know for sure.
    Still, as I say, soldiering on!

    [I transferred this over here as your post may soon be off myfdl’s front page.]

  4. Here’s an excellent followup from Gordon Campbell on the various submissions for the hearing on the streamlined surveillance bill in New Zealand:

    http://gordoncampbell.scoop.co.nz/2013/07/04/gordon-campbell-on-kim-dotcoms-latest-contribution-to-our-security-laws/

    The final paragraphs of this opinion piece emphasize what I commented on at FDL when placing the link to Dotcom’s testimony – that it was astonishing to me that PM Key thought the surveillance cloud could be likened to the megauploads of an entertainment service. And I’m delighted to see the Washington Post has picked up on this as well.

    [If you want to put this info over at FDL, wendye, feel free to do so.]

  5. I should add that the WP article puts the spin the ptb would love to see on the entire episode without even mentioning what Gordon Campbell ends his opinion piece stating, the huge misstep of Key. However, scroll down in the WP piece and see the excellent single comment at the bottom.

    Shame on the WP, but we know they have no shame.

  6. just for now, and you’ll see it yourself very soon, i wanted to say that evo is home and the unasur nations will meet today to discuss things among themselves concerning their next moves to protest his plane being kidnapped.

    the hatwear in the photo reminded me of a photo in my sixth grade geography book of a woman in multicolor woven cotton clothes wearing a black bowler on her head. the caption was ‘tin mining in bolivia’. the woman held a jagged grey rock in one hand, a tiny pick in the other, just ready to strike the rock.

    it blew my world apart wondering what it could all be about.

    i’ll read campbell’s piece later, juliania. looks good.

  7. A happy Fourth to all – Fourth Amendment, that is!

  8. i swear, woman; you are the best citizen patriot i know; you knock me out. ;~)

  9. I really don’t think so, wendye – I’ve only been to one protest ever in my whole long life, and there’s E.F. Beall, out there mingling with CodePink, and I remember you doing your Occupy back in the day too. Even when I protested the Iraq Invasion I had to do that pen in hand.

    But to each his own. I loved the work Isaiah 88 did on his Declaration, really fine. And there’s been another day of hearings down in Kiwiland/Aotearoa on the GCSB bill.

    I guess chaining oneself to the computer when a rained-on garden calls is a kind of sacrifice, eh? Don’t know whether you’d call it obsession or patriotism, but thanks – I prefer the latter! Thomas Jefferson was always retiring back to his grapevines throughout his career, and he was never on the frontlines defending the troops with musket and ball (though he was on a nearby hill when his homestead got raided by the British – very nice of them not to ransack it too.) We have this in common – love, love, love of books and garden.

    I spent the Fourth similarly retired reading the heavy tome TarheelDem had recommended to me way back – ‘Madison and Jefferson’. I still don’t quite see why the names are in reverse titlewise, but the point is well taken they had a close partnership all the way through, very interesting that young Thomas wrote the Declaration then was off in Paris when young Madison helped craft the Constitution, eh? Good thing they were buddies.

    Sounds like it is you have the Monticello, though – you lucky thing!

  10. i meant it as a compliment given that you pay so much attention to the care in creating the documents underlying this nation’s inception, Constitution and Bill of Rights so very rigorously, and always see hope in the future, even when mine falters.

    oh, isaiah’s post was a fine one. i clicked into one of letsgetidone’s link (nah), although i don’t know that it wasn’t a mite on the rude side to bring them, myself

    you must know of adams’ ‘jefferson lives’ quote, yes? what a tickle, lol
    http://www.danjacoby.com/politics/columns/writing/74_jefferson_lives.htm

    yes, i’ve been to more protests and peace marches and vigils than i can count, starting at kent state university in 1967.

    yes: you chain yourself to your books, laptop, and your principles: a heady combination, my friend.

  11. Thunder struck with laughter (and by a storm of near biblical proportion),

    As I have been working myself to real good and tired, I would normally be in dreamland right now, except for the first flash of lightning at precisely 3:00 still dark outside, followed by thunder and hammering rain. I was up to close a couple of windows to keep the rain out of the house and to comfort Mcat who was underfoot looking at me to quiet things down, as if I could. First time in the desk chair in days and I checked the important website.

    Thanks wendyedavis, an inch or more has poured since I put on the coffee (way to early), and watch the drenched morning breaking. I am enjoying having a chance to catch up on everyone else’s world. Same old, same though.

    With your writing talents is there going to be a book soon?

    Peace, Joy and resolve

  12. ah, so nice to see you here, darlin’ nonquixote. so happy this made ya laugh; i sure did when i was writin’ it. (but then, i am the female red skelton, allus laughin’ hardest at my own jokes…)

    holy hell, such storms! and what that lightning will do to help fix nitrogen to the crops that need it so! yum. the only wet we’ve had in months was about five minutes of hail, although there turned out to be enough snowmelt eventually that mr. wd did manage to get over the whole place once; that was a blessing.

    we had a bear the other night, which must mean that there aren’t many berries or acorns for them in the mountains, sadly.

    a book. nah, but i used to dream of getting some of my short pieces published, even scoped out small literary magazines that took submissions, and even bought the correct version of ‘the chicago manual of style’ tome to get it all right. finally figured blogging might be a better use of my words, and by now i’ve developed a lot of bad habits, lol.

    but some of those early pieces are over on the right under the category entry ‘stories and vignettes’, a mixed bag of stuff. peek at them at will.

    given your limited time at your computer chair, we are honored by your presence, *and* especially your crowing with laughter. ;-)

    and peace, joy, and resolve to you as well.

  13. “you must know of adams’ ‘jefferson lives’ quote, yes? what a tickle, lol
    http://www.danjacoby.com/politics/columns/writing/74_jefferson_lives.htm

    Oh yes, wendy – I just put an appeal up in a comment to rc that with all the imperfections of all the founders, a certain respect for providence is warranted.

    I certainly disagree with danjacoby’s generalizations about Jefferson – no GW he! He was in France whilst the Constitution was being patchworked, and one might understand his enthusiasm for the overthrow of the monarchy there – he could see firsthand the inequities between rich and poor. Also, his faith was perhaps overblown – he believed more in the power of the people than in executive sovereignty and was insistent a bill of rights be added to what had been crafted in the Constitutional Convention.

    It’s interesting that recent historical works give Jefferson less credit than he deserves and play up Adams, who gave a monarchical thrust to American democracy and was quite unhappy always that the people didn’t warm to him as they did to Jefferson. Both were flawed, don’t get me wrong, but both were honest men as far as wanting government to work – not at all what we have had lately.

  14. I certainly don’t admire Mount Rushmore. Should have stayed a mountain, to my way of thinking. Same for that Crazy Horse one. Yikes.

  15. shoot, now i’m embarrassed. i never read the whole jacoby piece i’d linked to. i do thank you for your take on the two of them, though, especially since i haven’t read more recent works comparing them.

    i’m searching my memory trying to remember where i’d given the recommendation for this film, and part of the reason was because it features some first americans who loathed mt. rushmore, esp. the character played by graham greene. his dying wish to his younger brother concerned that bias, let’s say. if your library can get it for you, please let them. indian humor is always underpinned by tragedy, of course, as is this film. best i’ve seen in a long time; lots of incredible music, as is the opening song which anchors the whole film.

  16. Oh thanks, wendye – I’ll certainly try to track this down. A wonderful thing living here on pueblo land, we have a little community center and some folk were partying – a family celebration of graduation from a nearby pueblo, not ours. My son was curious and drifted up to the door. Welcome! And he became their Elijah for the evening, feasted and backslapped complete stranger though he was. And that’s what they do.

  17. yes. that the residents of all the pueblos we visited were always welcoming, always ready to share caused those trips to be the most memorable ones of my life. although, the hopi are still my favorites, zunis second, i reckon.

    we were fortunate to see the last hopi snake dance before they closed it to anglos. we were also witness to the fact that: they did make it rain, no matter how crazy that sounds. broke a long drought cycle. it made me think so often of a priest friend who’d quip that god doesn’t make it rain. ;~)

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