Category Archives: climate change

Two reTweets for your consideration

First, from the Extinction Rebellion newsletter’s ‘Drones Are Changing Asymmetrical Warfare, September 18, 2019, Max Wilbert, deep green resistance news service

The following scheme is deranged, dangerous, and as disgusting as any thing I’ve heard promoted in a long time.  In fact, after having worked on this for a couple days, before bed last night I’d tossed my cookies when the images flashed in my mind like a neon light again.  It’s also insanely cavalier given how much of the world depends on oil for heating, cooling, and cooking through no fault of their own, and how many economies are based on oil.  Whose refineries does Wilbert imagine drone bombing next?
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terrifying numbers of fires ablaze in the Amazon rainforest


‘Wildfires rage throughout the Amazon rainforest’,
Bryan Dyne, 23 August 2019

“Satellite imagery reveals that at least a quarter of the Amazon rainforest is on fire or covered in soot and ash across the four Brazilian Amazonian states: Amazonas, Rondônia, Mato Grosso and Pará.
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a Marxist critique of the Green New Deals and Extinction Rebellion

‘Selling Extinction is a short introduction to the capitalist notion of a “Green New Deal”, the NGOs that support it and the recent Extinction Rebellion protests in London.’

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Venezuelan Ecosocialism

Featuring the following essay works well for me, as the triple themes I hold near and dear to my heart are represented: the coup against Nicolás Maduro (and past ones against Hugo Chavez), media bias, and ecosocialism.  Rather than bring some of the ghastly news in the next-generation attempts to overthrow his regime, I’ll focus on this and bring the rest another day.  And happy π day to all.

‘The Path to Climate Justice Passes Through Caracas’, March 9, 2019, counterpunch.org, David Schwartzman & Quincy Saul

In their Fighting the Media War section, the authors quote Karl Marx calling it “the war of calumny undertaken by the lying power of the civilised world,” and extras, describing the media war against the International Workingmen’s Association, which later became known as The First International.
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Scurrying Fascist Cockroaches

…is the title of a recent essay of John Steppling’s, and I contacted him at his website  (http://john-steppling.com/) to ask if given its length and breadth if I might use more of it than is strictly Fair Use as neither the Café nor c99% are for profit.  He wrote back and kindly said, “Use what you want from any of my writings”.  So I’ll most all of his Feb. 25 essay at DissidentVoice, although there’s a version at Counterpunch as well.
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Green Capitalism Aglow

There seem to have been quite a number of past iterations of Ocasio-Cortez & Co.’s #GreenNewDeal, as she now indicates, and offers her ‘Submitted’ One (text version is here).  This is Senator Markey’s Resolution (pdf) with ten cosponsors.

But here’s the main thing: the GND doesn’t confront the fossil fuel industry, but enables it instead.  Ecosocialists first came on my radar while covering the Rio 2012 sustainability conference.  Indigenous groups from Mexico, Central and South America had caravanned to the global elite conference, but weren’t allowed inside, so they held their own remarkable side conferences.  The Bolivian 2010 Peoples Agreement of Cochabamba was presented (as well as other heady Indigenous documents); it was the day I’d first understood the true evils of capitalism.  From their metaphorical second cousins the Indigenous Environmental Network:
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a current climate chaos compendium: Part III: water

This part will be full of horrifying facts and news, but my theory is ‘it’s better to know than to not know’.  Given its intensity, you may want to begin by wrapping your spirits and psyches in some sort of protective bubble that you’ve found helpful in the past.  Many readers will prefer ‘hope’ to ‘hopelessness’, and more on that at the bottom, but I did stick in a music video at the end that might be a bit of a tonic.
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